The Future of Travel Media

More than 600 travel bloggers, writers, podcasters, videographers and photographers from around the world attended the TBEX (Travel Blog Exchange) conference in Bangkok at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre, 15 – 17 October 2015.

“The best blogging community are the travel bloggers because they’re very, very happy.” – Anton Diaz

TBEX Asia 2015 was organized by the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT), Thailand Convention and Exhibition Bureau (TCEB) and Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA).

The conference was sponsored by Thai Airways, Turkish Airlines, Agoda, Viator and others.

Starting with the sessions, workshops and keynotes, and ending with the parties, the TBEX was a big success.

Going to Japan?

Learn the etiquette! A Japan good manners guide for travelers comes handy and the City of Kyoto has has just released the “Akimahen of Kyoto” using smart graphics and an emoji scale of severity for misbehaving.

“In Japan, I was immensely impressed by the politeness, industrious nature and conscientiousness of the Japanese people.” – J. Paul Getty

Did you know the taxi doors in Japan are opened and closed remotely by taxi drivers?

Do you know how to use the Japanese style toilets?

Don’t ride a bicycle while drunk: US $8000 fine or 5 years in prison!

Find out more about the etiquette in Kyoto and Japan.

By Xue Feng

Or Why I travel?

First of all, let me give a big sigh. This is the fifth time I re-write the opening paragraph. I’d blame on my fever I just got as a souvenir in this not-so-cold season in Beijing.

I just flew back from Seoul, a city full of crazy shopping malls that open almost 24 hrs. per day. Before this, I was travelling in Taiwan for roughly two months. Actually this is the first time for me going on a half a year trip. My travel routine usually ranges from one week to one month.

Bangkok street photography: city, people, faith, food, night life and fun photos with a story.

Black and Red

Bangkok at night reminds me of the “Sin City” neo-noir movie without the violence: the suspended highways right through the city, the sound of sirens, the strange-looking skyscrapers with a hint of gothic, the shanty places, the red light neon signs and the ladies of the night, the stray dogs and stray people in dark alleys.

Welcome to Cambodia!

The border crossing between Vietnam and Cambodia was like being in an old movie: dragging my luggage for kilometers on unpaved, country road, along the Mekong River.

Phnom Penh

In the evening I arrived at Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia. I took a walk on the streets and visited a market. No foreigners at all. I tried some grilled fish under the incredulous eyes of the locals. Not bad.  I stopped for a beer and a chat with the locals on the side of a busy road. It was funny to see women wearing pyjamas on the street in a central area of Phnom Penh!

The long way to Cambodia: from Saigon to Phnom Penh. It took me two days with boat through Mekong Delta and bus.

Sailing slowly through the Mekong Delta, I admired the scenery: fishermen, floating markets, houses on stilts.

The fishermen work in pairs: woman and man, in a small row-boat. The woman keeps the boat in position while the man throws the net into the water.

The floating market is quite something to watch.